Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic (lasting greater than six months) pain condition that most often affects one limb (arm, leg, hand, or foot) usually after an injury. CRPS is believed to be caused by damage to, or malfunction of, the peripheral and central nervous systems. The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord; the peripheral nervous system involves nerve signaling from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. CRPS is characterized by prolonged or excessive pain and changes in skin color, temperature, and/or swelling in the affected area. CRPS is divided into two types: CRPS-I and CRPS-II. Individuals without a confirmed nerve injury are classified as having CRPS-I (previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome). CRPS-II (previously known as causalgia) is when there is an associated, confirmed nerve injury. As some research has identified evidence of nerve injury in CRPS-I, it is unclear if this disorders will always be divided into two types. Nonetheless, the treatment is similar. CRPS symptoms vary in severity and duration, although some cases are mild and eventually go away. In more severe cases, individuals may not recover and may have long-term disability.

There are 1616 people in the CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome map

CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome life expectancy

What is the life expectancy of someone with CRPS Complex Regional Pain...

24 answers
Is CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome contagious?

Is CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome contagious?

23 answers
ICD9 and ICD10 codes of CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

ICD10 code of CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome and ICD9 code

13 answers
Is CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome hereditary?

Is CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome hereditary?

19 answers

CRPS COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME

Synonyms:
The key symptom is prolonged severe pain that may be constant. It has been described as “burning,” “pins and needles” sensation, or as if someone were squeezing the affected limb. The pain may spread to the entire arm or leg, even though the injury might have only involved a finger or toe. In rare cases, pain can sometimes even travel to the opposite extremity. There is often increased sensitivity in the affected area, known as allodynia, in which normal contact with the skin is experienced as very painful.
People with CRPS also experience changes in skin temperature, skin color, or swelling of the affected limb. This is due to abnormal microcirculation caused by damage to the nerves controlling blood flow and temperature. As a result, an affected arm or leg may feel warmer or cooler compared to the opposite limb. The skin on the affected limb may change color, becoming blotchy, blue, purple, pale, or red.
Other common features of CRPS include:
changes in skin texture on the affected area; it may appear shiny and thin
abnormal sweating pattern in the affected area or surrounding areas
changes in nail and hair growth patterns
stiffness in affected joints
problems coordinating muscle movement, with decreased ability to move the affected body part
abnormal movement in the affected limb, most often fixed abnormal posture (called dystonia) but also tremors in or jerking of the limb.

Types:
There are TWO TYPES OF CRPS
CRPS Type I , formerly known as RSDS, can follow a minor nerve injury, a simple trauma (fall or sprain), break or fracture (especially wrist and ankle), a sharp force injury (such as a knife or bullet wound), heart problems, infections, surgery, spinal injuries/disorders, RSI's (Repetitive Stress Injuries), CTS (Carpal Tunnel Syndrome), Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome, injections, and even some partial paralysis injury cases. There are some cases of CRPS Type I where there the nerve injury cannot be immediately identified. As many as 65% of CRPS/RSDS cases come from soft tissue injuries; such as burns, sprains, strains, tears, and most of the problems that end in “itis” ; bursitis, arthritis, and tendonitis to name a few.
New research done in 2006 by Dr Anne Louise Oaklander's team at Massachusetts General Hospital revealed the presence of small-fiber nerve damage in nearly all the CRPS Type I cases they studied. For more on this see question number 14 here
CRPS TYPE II, once known as CAUSALGIA, involves definable major nerve injury.
Early recognition of the disease, correct diagnosis, and proper treatment, are all essential in keeping CRPS from becoming a chronic condition. Treatment must begin within months of onset or significant probability of long-term disability occur. It is essential to find a CRPS-educated physican to ensure an early and correct diagnosis.

SYSTEMS AFECTED

Circulatory system
Circulatory system
Digestive system
Digestive system
Endocrine system
Endocrine system
Immune system
Immune system
Integumentary system
Integumentary system
Lymphatic system
Lymphatic system
Muscular system
Muscular system
Nervous system
Nervous system
Reproductive system
Reproductive system
Respiratory system
Respiratory system
Skeletal system
Skeletal system
Urinary system
Urinary system

Symptoms

  • See above

Treatments

  • Treatment consists of interventions that manage pain and the other secondary issues caused by the disease including:
  • Pain and nerve medications
  • Antidepressants, beta-blockers, and other drugs like Naltrexone that offer reduced pain as a side effect
  • Nerve blocks (sympathetic, peripheral, and lumbar)
  • SPinal cord and Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) stimulation
  • Ketamine and Neridronate infusions
  • Alternative therapies
  • Specialist who treat it

    Anaesthesiology Neurology Palliative Medicine/ Care Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy
    Natural treatment of CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Is there any natural treatment for CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome...

    17 answers
    Living with CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Living with CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. How to live with CRPS...

    16 answers
    CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome symptoms

    Which are the symptoms of CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

    24 answers
    CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome jobs

    Can people with CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome work? What kind of...

    23 answers

    Stories of CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    STORY
    CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome stories
    Life is full of choices. You can use your broken down car that barely putses along drive home. Or you can get out and try walking. Or you can try a bike. Well you can't do that with your body. So you drive or you don't.  But ultimately we ...
    CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome stories
    I was diagnosed about 3 months ago after 2 long years of pain and confusion.It all started in Aug 2013 when the stool I was standing on to silence the smoke alarm flipped.I fell into a wooden door frame at the time I thought I had a badly sprained fo...
    CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome stories
    Dear Loved One, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy also known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 is a rare chronic, painful, and progressive neurological condition that affects skin, muscles, joints, and bones that causes severe chronic pain, sympat...
    CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome stories
    I have Rsd.crps 2. I went into a doctor for help with my trigeminal nuerlagia.  It had flared up that day. My normal doctor was not in. So I went to someone else to get a normal pain shot in the hip where they go. And the doctor and nurse stuck ...
    CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome stories
    In 1992 I was working for the USPS delivering mail in Vacaville, CA when a step to a mobile home collapsed and I fell onto the big toe of my right foot.  The people had been warned before, but had ignored the notices.  I immediately called ...

    Tell your story and help others

    Tell my story

    View more

    CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome forum

    QUESTION
    Question 225
    Is anyone following some kind of natural treatment for CRPS? Is it working? Thanks!!
    Question 142
    Hello, which are the best treatments for CRPS? They could be medications (aspirin, ibuprofen, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, nerve-blocking medication) or therapies like heat and cold, guided exercisise… Thanks
    Question 371
    Good Morning,   I was wondering if anyone has had experience with Penn Pain Managemnet in Philadelphia?  I have had so amny other treatments including stellate ganglion blooks, lidocaine infusions (2x), ketamine infusion (won't do that agai...
    Question 231
    Anyone interested in coming along to the next APPG for CRPS?? This is will be London where you will be able to have your day talk to the mps already signed up and incurage your own to join us! We need to find a cure and to get and get help for everyo...

    Ask a question and get answers from other users.

    Ask a question

    View more

    Statistics of CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    96 people with CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome have taken the SF36 survey. Mean of CRPS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is 982 points (27 %). Total score ranges from 0 to 3,600 being 0 the worst and 3,600 the best. Take the SF36 Survey

    View more

    Find your symptoms soulmates

    From now on you can add your symptoms in diseasemaps and find your symptoms soulmates. Symptoms soulmates are people with similar symptoms to you.

    Symptoms soulmates

    Add your symptoms and discover your soulmates map

    Soulmates map